Business is Booming

Business is Booming

Business is Booming

Nat.Ind.Times:
Traci Williams

The success of the Australian Indigenous Minority Supplier Council (AIMSC) over the last few years has not only improved business opportunities for Aboriginal-owned businesses in Australia but led many to now look at ways to grow their own organisations not just at home but internationally. One AIMSC member, Corporate Culcha based on the Gold Coast in Queensland is the first to establish an international partnership with Springboard Leadership, a member of the American AIMSC-equivalent, the Minority Business Development Agency. 

"We are in a time of inclusion we've come out of 200 years of exclusion so there's a big transition happening from the both the Aboriginal community's point of view but also corporate Australia's. They're putting in these inclusion practices," Corporate Culcha Director, Paul Dodd said. "Corporate Culch a facilitates thatwith training and building the capacity and capabilities of the community to engage with corporate Australia and participate in the economy. We can share that knowledge and experience with organisations like Springboard."



AIMSC Chief Executive Officer, Natalie Walker said the real benefit the businesses have is the local knowledge of the market.

"Supporting the Indigenous business sector is crucial as we work towards halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians," the Minister said.

AIMSC itself couldn't be happier with the review results.

"There is a lot of intelligence we have and we understand the landscape when it comes to the type of work organisations like Corporate CuIcha does," she said. "They understand the reconciliation and whole policy environment and our businesses have that as a benefit."



AIMSC helped facilitate a business partnership between Pamela Carlton from Springboard Leadership in the United States (centre) and Russell Logan (left) and Paul Dodd (right) from Corporate Culcha. Her New York-based business specialises in leadership development and diversity and inclusion.

"The opportunities are limitless because companies are now becoming much more global," Ms Carlton said. "Coming to Australia and establishing a partnership with Corporate Culcha helps me build a global practice. "You have more diversity in terms of the immigrant population, the Aboriginal population that you can draw upon that is embedded in your communities than certain regions in the United States so there are opportunities for me to learn a lot and for me to broaden my expertise to take back to the US or use in other places around the world. "So I think of this as a hi-directional partnership."

Corporate Culcha is one of AIMSC's current Suppliers of the Year. Mr Dodd said the business has grown so much since it began in 2008 that international partnerships like those with Ms Carlton's organisation are a way for his company to enter new markets.

"Basically our clients are happy with the way we do our cultural competency programs," he said. "We do it nationally with a lot of large corporates and so one of those corporates asked us to think about the bigger picture around diversity and inclusion. "So it was very timely Pamela engaged AIMSC to find some companies in Australia that are like her company and we are collaborating in a venture to build a product around diversity and inclusion."

Ms. Walker said partnerships like these are the way of the future for Aboriginal businesses in Australia.

"Working with al.JS partner, for example, that should help them get access into the market in US and we want to see AIMSC suppliers getting size and scale and being able to take their products and services globally," she said. "All our members want to know about a supplier - they want to know about credentials. By forming partnerships they get automatic credentials which helps businesses to branch Out of the Indigenous space."

And as an African-American owned business in the US, Ms. Carlton has sonic sound words of advice for Aboriginal businesses in Australia.

"I would say be collaborative and not competitive with one another as there is so much opportunity. Figure out what you are good at as a company and find other consultants or people who can add to your product and build one another rather than competing against each other."

Ms. Walker said with the number of minority businesses coming out to Australia in early April for the AIMSC Connect Conference, she hoped that would bring an opportunity for Aboriginal businesses in Australia to look at developing partnerships with their Canadian and American counterparts, just as Corporate Chulcha and Springboard Leadership has done. 



For more information visit : Supply Nation     Springboard Leadership

 

http://www.supplynation.org.au

You have more diversity in terms of the immigrant population, the Aboriginal population that you can draw upon that is embedded in your communities than certain regions in the United States so there are opportunities for me to learn a lot and for me to broaden my expertise to take back to the US or use in other places around the world.